Portfolio of Works

Artist Statement PDF


Dunites

Documentation Video from Solo Exhibition
Gallery NAGA, Boston, September 2018

Includes 4K video, photographs, 35mm slides and 360-video installation.

This is my current research topic. In addition to the works exhibited in the video documentation above, a feature-length experimental documentary film and a publication of a book of photographic work are in progress.

Project Statement

My current multi-modal work in progress (2018-present), working title Shed on Passive Sands, uses news media; YouTube and public television programming, references to modernist photography by Ansel Adams and Edward Weston; popular folklore stories and songs; and streamed footage from public hearings to consider the current politically divided and environmentally threatened landscape of the coastal Oceano Dunes (one hour north of Santa Barbara, CA). I aim to pull up the history of this place from beneath the surface to populate the Dune site with a more profound sense of place and meaning, but also as a point of departure for conversation on the issues that extend far beyond this specific place. While the Oceano Dunes often appear as an empty, shifting landscape, through video, photography and virtual reality, my research weaves the rich histories of inhabitants spanning over 12,000 years – from the expunged Native American inhabitants, Cecil B. DeMille’s buried (and recently partially excavated) Ten Commandments ancient Egyptian film set, the proto-hippie squatters called the Dunites of the 1930’s, to the present-day ATV riders tearing up endangered species and polluting the air.

Selected Press

Podcast interview with Lana Z Caplan discussing this project
Exhibition Review on What Will You Remember


Autopoiesis

7:19, 4K video, 2019

Film Description

Autopoiesis (2019) is a short experimental film made with content sourced from the internet – clips of screen-recorded footage and sound, such as ski jumpers from the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, divers from Leni Riefenstahl’s film Olympia of the 1936 Berlin Olympics, self-hypnosis how-to videos, and Sun-Ra’s album Space is the Place. The video also includes overlays of text of current political and activist hashtags. As written in a review by arts writer and artist Heather Kapplow, “Autopoiesis intertwines complex ideas of utopia—Sun Ra’s speculative new black colony in outer space, Hitler’s Aryan nation, and the promise of a better world through hashtag activism—then counters it all by positing the impossibility of retreating or advancing, as the present moment is constantly buffeted with the darkness and struggle of current events.” I am responsible for all parts of production including sourcing and recording all the footage, editing and sound.

Selected Screenings

– Anarchivia (Mexico City, March 2019)
– ECHOFLUXX 19 (Prague, May 2019)
– AXW Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives (NYC, July 2019)
– VASTLAB Experimental Film Festival (Los Angeles, September 2019)
– Antimatter [media art] (Victoria, BC, October 2019)
– Transient Visions Festival of the Moving Image (Johnson City, NY, October 2019)
– Other Cinema (San Francisco, November 2019)
– Stuttgarter Filmwinter (Stuttgart, January 2020)
– Portland Underground Film Festival (Portland, OR, January 2020)
– Space Time Event Series (San Diego, CA, January 2020)
– Experimental Response Cinema @ Museum of Human Achievement (Austin, TX, January 2020)
– Cosmic Rays Film Festival (Chapel Hill, NC, March 2020)
– That One Film Festival (Livestream, September 2020)
– 27th Annual Chicago Underground Film Festival (Livestream, November 2020)
– Marseille Underground Film and Music Festival (Marseille, France, November 2021)


Patches of Snow in July

8:19, HD video, 2017

Film Description

Encompassing themes of media manipulation and environmental greed, Patches of Snow in July (2017) began as a reaction to the 2016 Presidential election. Mythology, religious fanaticism, climate deniers, environmental profiteers, natural disasters, and the end of radio, are reflected by a morphing landscape, poised for new devastation. Footage includes images I recorded of the Maui volcano Haleakala paired with a soundscape of collected audio simulating turning the dial on a radio, catching news and music clips. I am responsible for all parts of production including cinematography, editing and sound.

Selected Screenings

– Alchemy Film and Moving Image Festival (Hawick, Scotland, May 2018)
– The Vast Lab (Los Angeles, May 2018)
– Microscope Gallery (Brooklyn, May 2018)
– Chicago Underground Film Festival (Chicago, June 2018)
– OpenEyes FilmFest (Marburg, Germany, July 2018)
– San Diego Underground Film Festival (August 2018)
– Festival des Cinémas Différents et Expérimentaux de Paris (October 2018)
– Antimatter [media art] (Victoria, BC, October 2018)
– Other Cinema (San Francisco, CA, October 2018)
– Kassel DokFest (Kassel, Germany, November 2018)
– Anarchivia (Mexico City, March 2019)
– AWAC Consciousness of Changing Climate (Berlin, July 2019)
– CineAutopsia – Festival de Cine Experimental de Bogotá (August 2019)
– Canyon Cinema Salon (San Francisco, November 2019)
– Royal Scottish Academy (Edinburgh, December 2019 – January 2020)
– Portland Underground Film Festival (Portland, OR, January 2020)

Selected Press

Critical essay on L’emergere del possibile about Patches of Snow in July


Maelstroms

7:40, HD video, 2015

Film Description

Maelstroms (2015) uses animation, heat sensitive camera footage from US border patrol screens, military bombing drone monitors, and other collected footage, in a mediation on the dehumanizing use of image technology to control borders by land, air and sea. Maelstroms won the Audience Award at CROSSROADS Film Festival in San Francisco and has been included in numerous exhibitions and festivals around the world including the Museum of Contemporary Art Tucson.

Festivalist.com Review
“a harrowingly intense look at how modern surveillance imaging creates a dehumanizing gaze. The film cuts between US border-patrol footage, drone footage, and various other forms of surveillance, all of which are presented in disconcerting shades of grey, like a negative transfer. a harrowingly intense look at how modern surveillance imaging creates a dehumanizing gaze. The film cuts between US border-patrol footage, drone footage, and various other forms of surveillance, all of which are presented in disconcerting shades of grey, like a negative transfer. ” Rohan Berry Crickmar, festivalists.com

Selected Screenings

*Winner of Audience Choice Award* CROSSROADS 2016 (San Francisco, April 2016)
– Anthology Film Archives, Another Experiment by Women Film Festival (NY, NY, Feb 2016)
– Microscope Gallery Event Series (Brooklyn NY, October 2016)
– San Diego Underground Film Festival (San Diego, Nov 2016)
– Havana Film Festival (Havana, Cuba, December 2016)
– Alchemy Film and Moving Image Festival (Hawick, Scotland, March 2017)
– Montreal Underground Film Festival (Montreal, May 2017)
– Chicago Underground Film Festival (Chicago, June 2017)
– Currents New Media Festival (Santa Fe, NM, June 2017)
– WDNX Festival of Moving Image (Winnipeg, October 2017)
– Museum of Contemporary Art Tucson (Tucson, AZ, October – December 2017)
– Experimental Response Cinema (Austin, TX, January 2018)
– That One Film Festival (Muncie, IN, April 2018)
– The Vast Lab (Los Angeles, July 2018)
– Other Cinema (San Francisco, October 2018)
– Revolutions per Minute Festival (Boston, February 2019)
– Anarchivia (Mexico City, March 2019)
– Pleasure Dome Screening Series (Toronto, December 2019)
– Royal Scottish Academy (Edinburgh, December 2019 – January 2020)
– LABOCINE Magazine, Unequal States, Issue 48, (July 2020)
– RhizomeDC Microcinema (August 2020)


The Loveliest Mountain of China

Installation Documentation, 2014

3 – 40″ televisions vertically wall-mounted
3 – computers
2 – wall-mounted horn speakers
Total running time of loop in installation: 45 minutes
color, HD, sound

Project Description

The three-channel video installation The Loveliest Mountain of China was filmed in the popular tourist destination Huangshan, China and installed in Beijing at the Inside Out Art Museum. This work lays bare the bones of the participatory documentary medium, deconstructing narrative film production modalities, and presents them across a wall space on three screens simultaneously. Comprised of three vertically hung monitors – one with interviews, one of fixed camera landscape views and one of “B-roll” of tourists posing in front of the mountain, a self-reflexive epi-narrative unfolds between the screens with an awareness of the illusion of ethnographic representation, gaps in translation, and the complexities of the politics of land use. The ecological impact of tourism and the illusion of transcendence is approached through the voices and perspectives of people who inhabit and visit – the locals and the tourists – the picturesque landscape of Huangshan (Yellow Mountain).

ARTnews Review
The Loveliest Mountain in China was described in a review of the work in ARTnews Magazine – “one monitor shows the Hunagshan mountains from several vantage points during shifting light and weather.  The next monitor displays tourists posing for pictures on a scenic overlook, and the third focus on people in the Huangshan tourism business – including porters, hotel employees and a local artist – explaining their impressions of the location where they earn a living.  Change is a constant: clouds hide the sun, gusts stir branches and ponytails, cell phones ring.  Caplan’s video highlights just how disparate experiences of the same spot can be, juxtaposing the magnificent spectacle of towering peaks with the bustle of tourism and the realties of everyday life. ” Joanne Sliver, ARTnews